Fereshteh Shahmiri

PhD in Computer Science - School of Interactive Computing - Georgia Institute of Technology

 

Technology Square Research Building
85 Fifth Street NW
Atlanta, GA 30308

© 2017 by Fereshteh Shahmiri. All rights reserved.

Bentley Systems, Inc (CAD/CAM Software Production) | GenerativeComponents (GC) | Parametric Modeling Software

Fall - Winter 2014

 

 

 

Researched on ENVIRONMENTAL ANALYSIS |

 

Developing GC ANALYSIS Add-in | VERTICAL SKY COMPONENTS (VSC) ANALYZER NODE

Running Process in Local and Cloud Modes

 

Research on the Identity of the Vertical Sky Component Value and Standard 

Developing the Analyzer node for calculation of VSC Value in the Analysis Add-in part

 

Development Environment:

Visual Studio 2008, C#, GC script, C++

GenerativeComponents ( GC Core and GC Add-ins for Optimization, Structural, Energy and Inolation Analysis)

PowerPlatform : MicroStation

 

 

 

Work in Progress

 

What is Vertical SKY Component (VSC)?

How VSC has to be calculated?

 

The Vertical Sky Component is a measure of the amount of skylight incident on a vertical plane (it is the Sky Factor on a Vertical Plane). It is most commonly applied to the light incident at the center of a window and in this sense is a measure of the potential for good daylighting. The VSC is calculated by taking the ratio of the skylight incident at a point to the unobstructed skylight available at that same point on a horizontal plane. For a uniform sky, the maximum value is 50% (since the point is on a vertical plane, clearly only half the hemisphere can contribute). For a CIE sky, the maximum value is 39.6%.

 

Clearly, the further down the windows are, the less light they receive, and the lower the value of the VSC.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

BRE Criterion
The guidelines state that if the VSC at the centre of a window is less than 27% and less than 0.8 times its former value, the diffuse daylighting of the existing building will be adversely affected. A value of 27% corresponds to an infinite obstruction angle of 25 degrees. This guideline (as with all the BRE guidelines) can be interpreted flexibly. The above criterion was developed in the case of suburban development where existing development was 2 storeys across an average street width. In city centre locations, the target VSC can be reduced to allow proposed buildings to match the height of other buildings in the neighbourhood.

Reference :

http://www.waterslade.com/services/daylight_sunlight/vertical_sky_comp.htm

 

VSC calculator

Reference:

http://www.waterslade.com/VSCCalculator/vsccalc.htm

VSC Analyzer node is placed in part of the Environmental Analysis and in Insolation analysis GC Add-in plug in

 

The way of access to the VSC analyzer node in GC environment:

Implementation of the VSC Analyzer node, it's structure and required inputs and outputs